Hotel history

 

In the middle of the XIX century Buenos Aires was still a great village with dusty cars, tired hooves, street peddlers, gauchos, ''compadritos'', dandies and politicians all over the place. By the end of the century Buenos Aires and looking up to Europe and started to create a new image for the city. Tracing the present Avenida de Mayo was trought by the first city Mayor, Torcuato de Alvear. In fact, this would facilitate traffic, hygiene and also embellish the capital. After great debate, in 1883 the proyect to create the avenue was passed and its design would follow a Parisian model. Some of the constructions had the solidity of centuries. Most of the owners of the ''thirteen condemned'' blocks that were going to be expropriated mainly belonged to ''porteño'' patriarchs. The measure establishd was 30 meters in accordance with the Opera Avenue, 6.50 meters for sidewalks and 17 meters for the pavement. Following the London system, urinals  were also planned. Gas and electricity lighting were to be used, the first, with great lamps and brass columns as in Paris. Under express petition of building owners, no tramways would ever run along the avenue. The buildings had to follow specially made provisions, with a certain height, despite the variety of styles and architects involved in the designing and posterior construction. The whole avenue is surrounded by theatres, cafés, book stores, hotels  as well as the outstanding ALCAZAR HOTEL at 935 Mayo Avenue, built in 1885 by the prestigiousarchitect Cerioli with a facade, windows and doors according to his time. It still keeps the original stair case of an exquisite colonial style. Its balconies over Mayo Avenue are silent witnesses of traditional ''corsos''. There are three patios-gardens that embellish the tranquillity of the place. The avenue was opened on July 9th 1894. Defining Mayo Avenue certainly implies achieving the expression of Buenos Aires in intrinsic relation with Spain. It has something from the Catalonian promenade, Alcalá Street and La Gran Via, somehow explaining how Catalonians feel in Madrid and Madrileños in Barcelona..."